Time to Walk on the Wild Side…

Amanda Vallone

 

A trip to Victoria Falls allows for a great adventure opportunity. There are helicopter rides over the falls, bungee jumping off the bridge, diving in the borders of Zambia and Zimbabwe, and white water adventures.

Many of the people in our group could not choose what they wanted to do as a side trip so they chose to enjoy a few things.

About 8 of our Explorers took a helicopter ride over the falls. From what I heard, it was quite an incredible experience.

15 of us decided to live on the WILD side…

The evening after our daring jump into Devils Pool, 15 of our group members decided to walk with the lions. We did not know what we were getting ourselves into. Would we be eaten alive, would we get to touch them? Would we only get to be with the cubs?

We would soon find out.

Our guide and driver picked us up at the hotel and brought us out into the bush to a wildlife refuge. Along the way our bus broke down and we had to hoof it about ½ a mile through the bush. We were all concerned a lion would find us looking quite yummy for their dinner…

Upon safe arrival to Lion Encounter, we were offered a beverage and given a briefing as to how to walk with the lions. We were all given a stick to protect ourselves. You read that right, a STICK was our protection against these creatures. If a lion lunged at us we were to point the stick at them and say “no.” Whaaat?????

So, off we went. Splitting into two groups, my group took the path with more of a hike and the other group went along more flat land in the opposite direction.

And out came the first two lions.

Trained they were! But wild animals just the same.

Paula was the first one up to walk with the lions. I think everyone stopped breathing as she approached him.

Then each of us took our turns to follow walking with these amazing creatures and getting photos along the way.

When I say this experience was magical, I really mean it. To say you walked, and even touched, a lion is quite spectacular.

I to this day cannot believe we did it.

The walk alone was a full hour or more. When we were done we were served a nice small meal and given some drinks. We then learned a lot about the conservation, how the lions were brought here, and how they’re prepared for release into a pride.

I had a few guests on my trip who did not want to participate in this experience because they watched a documentary about experiences like this that would kill the lions after they were done with them. How horrible!

The Lion Encounter is all about ethical rehabilitation and release into the wild. They do not declaw or de-tooth their lions, which is what you hear of at some of those places. It was the goal and priority of Salute Africa not to fund any of the inhumane projects. So, they paired us up directly with Lion Encounter.

Our group was so impressed by this experience and what they do for the lions. It was incredible. But a picture is worth a thousand words. Check out our photos:

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What the heck is Mosi-oa-Tunya?

The Smoke that Thunders, of course!

Amanda Vallone

 

One cannot visit Zimbabwe, or Victoria Falls for that matter, without at least hearing the story of David Livingstone. A Scottish explorer set out to Africa, David Livingstone may have been the first white man to set his eyes on the beauty of Mosi-oa-Tunya. In May of 1856, Livingstone reached the mouth of the Zambezi on the Indian Ocean, making him the first European to cross the width of southern Africa.

The waterfall system that is shared by Zambia and Zimbabwe was named Victoria Falls by Livingstone himself, after Queen Victoria.

It is said that among all the dry land throughout Zambia and Zimbabwe, Livingstone could hear a thunderous roar and see a plume of smoke above. It looked as though there was a massive fire until he got closer. It was the smoke that thunders of Mosi-oa-Tunya, the largest falls in the world.

Victoria Falls is 355 feet in height and spread across the border of Zimbabwe and Zambia. David Livingstone landed at the biggest island at the lip of the falls, which is now known as Livingstone Island. On our walking tour of the falls we stopped at many lookouts and ended at a statue of the explorer himself. Victoria Falls was simply spectacular! This UNESCO world heritage site is also known as one of the 7 natural wonders of the world. For those checking off their bucket or “live it” list, Victoria Falls is surely one not to be missed.

My Opinion: I grew up in Buffalo, New York, and every single field trip seemed to be a trip to Niagara Falls. Though Niagara is quite spectacular as well, and it too boarders two countries (USA and Canada), its size alone is 167 feet to Victoria’s 355. Though I completely recommend going to Niagara, Victoria Falls was the most amazing falls I have ever experienced… It might be because of my next adventure though… Devils Pool.

Handicap accessible? Sure! We actually had 4 wheelchairs being pushed around the falls on that day. 3 of my ladies plus my mom were not able to make this long walk, but certainly did not want to miss the experience. So our guide set up a few wheelchairs to meet us at the entry and some strapping young gents to push my non-walkers. The cost was only $20 and the money was well earned. All my non-walkers knew how strenuous it is to push a chair on uneven walkways, and a gratuity was surely rewarded for their labor.

Child friendly? Of course! Aurora absolutely loved the falls and giggled in delight at how loud they were. She even loved the little monkeys roaming all over. Strollers could get around just like the wheelchairs. But a word of advice to parents, hold your wee ones hand or keep them strapped in a stroller as there are many lookout points and stairways without guard rails or steep cliffs.

Devils Pool

Located at the top of the falls on the Zambian side of Victoria Falls, the Devils Pool takes a boat ride, a hike, a swim and a jump to complete. After thousands of years of erosion, many rock pools have formed at Victoria Falls. Devils Pool just happens to be one of them. Located right on the very edge of the sheer drop of the falls, adrenaline junkies can make their way to Devils Pool and jump right in. This is indeed the ultimate infinity pool.

On our adventure we had a group of 6 courageous—and many might think somewhat brainless—people take on the Devils Pool challenge. But I have to say, our crazy decision was one of the best experiences of my life.

So how did we survive the jump into Devils Pool?

Well, after upping my life insurance before leaving the states (just kidding), we set our minds on our edge of the world survival jump.

Our party of 6 was taken from our hotel in Zimbabwe over to a 5* property, Livingstone Manner – one of the most amazing properties I have ever seen. With zebras right on the property and a seating area with views of the waterfall, river, and herds of hippos, we felt like we died and went to heaven. But we did not want our minds going down that path…

We had two guides bring us on a boat ride to Livingstone Island, where we then were welcomed with a celebratory drink and the ability to change our clothes into swimwear.

Whatever happens do not forget your water shoes!

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One guide explained everything that would happen, and the other was in charge of our safety. As the river is only low enough to allow visitors to take this jump from August to January, safety is of top concern. We took some photos at the top of the falls on land first. I had a few mini heart attacks along the way. All I kept thinking was how dumb we all were (primarily me, bringing 5 others on this crazy adventure). One more step back and over the falls we would have been. Just writing this sends shivers down my spine.

Then we all left our belongings on the rocks of the dry land before making the swim across the rush of the river. We had a guide rope, and any poor swimmers had the guide to help them along. This area was not deep, but super rocky so you had to swim rather than walk.

We then proceeded onto dry and uneven rocks before making our way to the Devils Pool—eeeeek!

The first person to jump was our guide, showing us how to accomplish this daring feat. Next up was Barbara, then everyone else followed suit.

This pool was very deep in areas and the water was like a whirlpool. Our guide instructed us on how to get to the devils arm, the ledge at the end of the earth that was supposed to keep us safe. Call me crazy, but how does a ledge that we will sit on in the rush of water keep us safe from going over?

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But… it did!

We were then instructed to pose for the camera – you know, we had to prove that we made it and actually didn’t chicken out.

After playing around in the water, taking tons of photos for proof, and gazing over the edge of a 355 foot-tall waterfall, we decided it was time to go back.

Mary Lou was my only one who did not jump in… but being in her 80’s and making it all the way to Devils Pool is pretty freaking amazing, right? The rocks to the pool were just too uneven for her.

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This experience was not only exhilarating, it was my first point during this trip where I realized “this is the best trip I have ever been on.”

After making it back to land, we were served a fresh and home-cooked breakfast that was to die for.

What can I say? Devils Pool at Victoria Falls was a life changing experience!

 

 

And this wasn’t even the end of the trip! Keep an eye out for what happened next!

Goodbye South Africa, Hello Zimbabwe!

Amanda Vallone

After an early morning flight on South African Airways (great airline – they include a meal on every flight and perfectly poised flight attendants), we landed in Zimbabwe, home of Victoria Falls!

After exiting the airport, we were welcomed to Zimbabwe by traditional singers and dancers—It was amazing!

Visas: When you fly or Drive from South Africa to Zimbabwe you actually cross borders into a new country. Often times people I run into think of Africa as one big country — it is a continent!!! When you go from one country into another you have to cross the borders of that country and go through their visa and passport checking system. I will say South Africa was the most intimidating one to me, but Zimbabwe was no joke either. After debarking our plane we were walked down a ramp to the checkpoint. My group had to be prepared for 2 different kinds of visas. Six of my people needed a multi-entry visa from Zimbabwe and Zambia called the KAZA because these 6 were going to take a jaw dropping adventure to jump into the Devil’s Pool at the top of Victoria Falls on the Zambian side.

The rest of my group only needed a single-entry visa. These Visas range from $30-50 cash depending on the type.

Of course, when we went to purchase our KAZA visa they were not issuing them anymore L Did this mean we wouldn’t get to take our Devils Pool adventure?

No… We just had to buy 2 single entry visas at the airport, then another visa at the Zambian Border—i.e. spend more money. It seems like all government is on the same path worldwide hehehe.

So we all had our visas and we were on our way. •

The Best Welcome!

After exiting the airport, we were met by a group of 10 men wearing traditional dress of Zimbabwe and singing the most amazing songs. I believe they were performing a traditional Mbakumba dance. Since dancing is very important in the Zimbabwean culture, it was a fantastic way to start our journey through Zimbabwe.

Climate: Opposite of South Africa being very green and chilly, Zimbabwe was about 80-90˚F and extremely dry. Before hopping into our transfer vehicle, we all stripped off all those layers from the morning to t-shirts and pants or shorts.

This is what we all thought Africa would look like.

After a short ride with our tour director, Mombassa, we made our way to Kingdom Lodge, Victoria Falls, where we were met again by a traditionally dressed man.

Kingdom Lodge: We stayed at a 4* resort in Victoria Falls called Kingdom Lodge. It was extremely beautiful and the rooms were quite spacious. Breakfast in the morning was amazing. And this was our first real opportunity to use the pool—refreshing! Our resort had a bar, a pool, a gift shop, a few restaurants, and even wildlife living on property. It was anything you could want and more from a trip to Zimbabwe. It was family friendly too!

But we weren’t there to soak up the hotel amenities. We were there to experience the Mosi-oa-Tunya (read on…), but we would have to wait until the morning.

So, for our evening experience we enjoyed a sunset cruise on the Zambezi river.

Our small pontoon boat sailed slowly upstream meandering along the banks of the river in search of wildlife big and small. The Zambezi River is Africa’s fourth largest river system after the Nile, Zaire, and Niger Rivers. This river actually runs through six countries and into the Indian Ocean. Many of its dams are harnessed for power, though the Zambezi is the least developed in terms of human settlement, as many of the areas are protected.

Along this cruise we saw elephants on the bank, hippos peeking up out of the water, and various species of birds. This was our first “wildlife adventure” and we loved it. We were served hors d’ourves and had an open bar along our journey, meaning we were able to toast the most amazing African sunset!

This was a great experience!

Was it handicap accessible? Yes and no. As you can see there was a ramp to get on the boat. So boarding and disembarking the vessel was certainly accessible. To get into the port-a-potty type bathroom you had go up 2 steps, and it would not be safe for anyone to attempt if they had a walking disability like my mom. But it was only a 2 hour boat ride, so don’t let that deter you from taking this adventure if you are wheelchair bound.

The location that we boarded the boat however, had a steep hill to walk down that was not paved so getting a wheelchair down this would have been very difficult. I am pretty certain the operators would have moved the boat to board a wheelchair or had a backup plan. My mother walked it. It was not easy for her but she did it and was happy she did.

Boma Dinner: Known as more than a night out, it was an EXPERIENCE!

The Boma Dinner Experience began after dark with a traditional greeting in the local languages, Shona and Ndebele. We were all hugged, dressed in chitenges (traditional robes) and prepared to enter the main enclosure by the addition of a face painting.

After we entered, we were invited to take part in a hand washing ceremony and then let loose to  sample traditional beer (that was worth one try, but not on my top 10,000 things to taste again) and snacks, as a prelude to dinner.

Partially open to the African skies, the Boma offers a unique experience that bombards the senses with the tastes, sights, sounds and smells of Africa. There was not only food and entertainment, but handicraft workers and artists selling their wares. You could even go and have the bones cast by the Sangoma (traditional healer). All of this together with the warmth and hospitality of Zimbabwe and its people, Boma was the perfect dining experience for our group.

Several of us even were awarded a certificate of bravery for eating the Mopani Worm- that’s right! We ate a WORM, people.

Don’t believe me? Watch the video umm chewy!

The food was plentiful, there were many vegetarian options as well as desserts, meats, and sides. In all honesty, I enjoyed this food much more than the dinner in Cape Town. To anyone going on this adventure, I would recommend not choosing one over the other- go to both Gold & Boma—they are too different to only choose one.

Don’t tune out too quickly though… wait to see what we did next!

Explorer Spotlight: Patricia Bovio

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What made you interested in traveling to Hawaii as a family?

 

We’ve wanted to visit Hawaii for a while. We were also very attracted to what it has to offer and that there are so many different things to do like hiking, sight-seeing, nice beaches, etc.  We got the recommendation of doing a cruise and that was definitely the best option to see different islands without the hassle of traveling in between.

 

What was the best part of Hawaii?

 

We absolutely loved all the islands and what each had to offer. Our absolute winner was Hilo and the excursion to the Kilauea. Seeing the old lava flows and the volcano so close, made for an extraordinary experience that we will never forget. We really got to see Mother Nature in all its splendor.

 

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How would you describe traveling with your 2 year old to Hawaii?

 

Surprisingly it was not too bad (other than the long flights), we were also surprised to see many other families traveling with babies and young kids as well. Because we were doing so many things and constantly changing sceneries, Sophia was busy and entertained. We did not even have to go around everywhere with toys or other things, only plenty of drinks and a few snacks. All the tours we took were very patient and accommodating with us and the baby. The cruise was definitely the best way to go, since we wanted to see more places and did not have to worry about constantly packing and unpacking and the time that consumes. The only disadvantage was the limited space; next time we will definitely look into having a little bit more room.

 

Do You Know the Real Story of Mount Rushmore?

Knowing the “Real”story behind a destination: Mount Rushmore

By Amanda Vallone

Have you ever wondered what the “real story” is behind a destination, piece of art, or monument? If you are like most, you have probably learned about famous sights in history from a book, magazine articles, history lesson, or television show. It is a unique opportunity to put that knowledge to the test when you see the sight in person.

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One of the most recognizable monuments in the US is Mount Rushmore- nearly three million people each year travel worldwide to marvel at the majestic beauty of the Black Hills of South Dakota and see the National Monument to four of our nation’s most influential leaders. What may surprise you, is that it was not the original idea of artist Gutzon Borglum to create a monument to the president to the badlands of South Dakota… rather, South Dakota historian Doane Robinson was initially looking to bring tourists to the badlands by celebrating the West. They were to commission an artist to sculpt Western heroes like Oglala Lakota leader Red Cloud, explorers Lewis and Clark, and Buffalo Bill Cody into the nearby stone pinnacles known as the Needles. But the dream of making this tourist attraction large enough to draw people from around the globe needed to be larger than the Needles…. It needed to be carved into the side of a mountain. And so, it was.

Did you know:

* Jefferson was supposed to be on Washington’s Right? But the rock didn’t work out so his face was blasted out and replaced to the left.

* There is a hall of records behind the head of President Lincoln which holds our Nation’s most valuable information and is stored and meant to be opened thousands of years from now to educate our future generations.

* The carving was originally meant to include the bodies of the presidents down to their waists.

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* In 1937, a bill was introduced to Congress to add the image of women’s rights leader Susan B. Anthony to the mountain… But then, Congress then passed a bill requiring only the heads that had already been started be completed.

* 400 men worked on Mount Rushmore, only one of whom was hired an artist, the rest were miners who were good with dynamite. Surprisingly, no man died during this project.

* The one artist Borglums did hire Korczak Ziolkowski, to work as an assistant on the mountain. But after 19 days and a heated argument with Borglum, Korczak Ziolkowski left the project. He would later begin another mountain carving nearby, Crazy Horse Memorial, which today is the world’s largest mountain sculpture in progress.

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You see, some of the most famous monuments in our nation have a lot of interesting and fun facts behind them. This summer the Aging Tree will take a group departure to Mount Rushmore and get a first hand view of these 60 foot tall carvings in the side of a mountain that draw over 3 million visitors from around the world every year. This guided tour brings you to experience the greatness of Mount Rushmore, sightseeing, dinner, and the spectacular lighting of the memorial at night. You will partake in

a patriotic welcome and salute to our Veterans and the Presidents who were chosen for their significant contribution to the founding, expansion, preservation, and unification of this great country.

Do you want to learn more about Mount Rushmore, or the rest of the destinations on this departure including Yellowstone, Grand Tetons, Devils Tower and Crazy Horse Memorial?

Join us February 28th at 4:30 at the Aging Tree for more information. Call 386-734-7245 today to RSVP and for more information- CLICK HERE

Can I tell you a story about the time I lived in India

My Bollywood Adventure… Well maybe not quite that glam.

By Amanda Vallone

Picture this, I am in my last year of grad school at Auburn University and my husband (yes, husband- I was a child bride) was completing his second bachelors degree in Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering also at Auburn University.  It is 2008 and George (hubby) is taking graduate classes at university and working on some scientific things I couldn’t even begin to explain pertaining to everything from space travel, rockets, to providing sufficient hydration and protection for our military while learning about renewable energy sources.

December of 2007 we were offered the opportunity only seven students in the whole University were awarded- the chance to travel abroad to India all expenses paid if we came back with a research project and an international perspective of the “foreign -exchange student” experience to share with other Auburn students in our own curriculum.

So what would any other poor, working (three jobs)- yet barely surviving, adventurous student do before they had to graduate and get their “big boy and big girl jobs”?

I don’t think you need to think hard to figure that one out… We of course said YES to the opportunity to travel to India and take part in the 4 month research program. No Questions Asked!

Hahahaha- we were literally crazy. We knew nothing about India and we had to apply for our Visas, find a place to stay, work, research, and figure out the travel. We were connected to one of the most prestigious universities in all of India and even the wold- IIT Madras.

Except, upon arrival, they did not have housing for us- party foul! How does one travel this far and plan for 6 months without a place to stay?

 

So what did we do? We left Chennai and traveled 7 hours down mostly unpaved, bumpy, dirt roads to Tiruchirappall, IIT Trichy to stay at a neighboring university for our first two weeks until we could find other accommodations and come up with plan B.

The drive was… rough. I will leave it at that. No, I am not talking about the bumpy roads. That was difficult too, but getting off at street markets and needing to use a eastern facility that is similar to an outhouse is a bit more of what I am considering rough. And figuring out what to eat,  or what not to eat, and the conversion of money… it was all a bit much on extreme jet lag.

  • At this point in my story I am wondering if those reading it are questioning how I got into the travel industry if I am “complaining” — keep reading on…

So we arrive in Trichy after asking directions (because there are not street signs everywhere) and people just give head nods to our drivers questions “Ana Trichy Bono” Which means “Which way Trichy, thank you?!”

Things I saw along the way:

  • Signs for STD’s everywhere- say whaaaat? I later found out it was their sim card for their phone. Totally different from what I would have ever guessed.
  • Coconut Oil- You think you are up on the latest trend by using beauty products or cooking with Coconut Oil in the last few years? India has been doing it forever. No conditioner to be found… but Coconut Oil is sold at the street corner shop in individual packages.
  • Monkeys… they just ran right across the street like squirrels do here. Difference is, if we hit a squirrel in the states we might be upset or even cry about it… In India if you hit a monkey you will sell your car because it is bad luck and some believe monkeys are gods.
  • Rickshaws- an awesome form of transportation to try once or twice.
  • Motorcycles as the family vehicle- with 5-6 people piled up on them
  • Traffic lanes that fit three times the amount of vehicles we would ever dare into the same area.

So we spent our two week allotment at IIT Trichy worked in their lab and met with countless professors about engineering stuff that was over my head. I am not dumb by any means, it just was not interesting at all. The culture however, was extremely interesting. I went to temples, bazaars, and watched traditional dance performances after every single meeting. One of my favorite parts of India was mingling with the people.

We went to the famous Rock Fort that is said to geologically date back a billion years (the actual rock). This historic Rock Fort and temple complex are built on the very top of this huge hill/ rock that measures 273 feet high in the city of Tiruchirapalli. It was truly a pilgrimage to so many. For us, it was our first temple and an amazing experience. We had to take our shoes off before going in and walk barefoot out of respect. The colors on the walls were spectacular and the carvings and designs of the gods and deities were spectacular. There are two Hindu temples inside the Rockfort, The Uchchi Pillaiyar Koil and The Siva Temple.

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This temple was just the beginning of us visiting countless more temples and faith-filled places. It really was quite an experience.

So onto the rest of our time.

I had a professor in the states, Dr. Veena Chattaraman who had a connections with the Gandhi Rural Rehabilitation Centre (GRRC), which was located in a little rural village just a couple hours away in Alampoondi. GRRC was originally founded by monks who wanted to help those of society who were considered “castaways” including those who had leprosy.  GRRC is now working with the disadvantaged and under privileged village youth, children, women, widow and handicapped people.

Since I was an undergraduate student of Fashion Design and a Masters of Science in Consumer Affairs with emphasis in Entrepreneurship in the apparel industry my project was to come to GRRC and help the handloom weavers and the tailors create designs that would be marketable to a more “Western” market. And to then help with the marketing plan of this.

George was to stay with me and bring solar energy to this community or at least this compound, as they were so far off the grid there would be three days at a time we did not get electricity.

Some of the best people in all of India we met were located right here… they did not speak English, and our only way to communicate was pointing and hand motions or with the one gentleman who could speak Tamil and English. Mr. Kumar was the director of the compound, welcomed us into his facility  and into his home for dinner on a few occasions. He had a different type of home because it was whats they called a “love marriage” rather than an arranged marriage. They educated us greatly on the cultural views of marriage, cast system, and what they thought of the US… it was an election year and an Olympic year too. Being an outsider looking into these events was quite an interesting experience.

We stayed in India for about 4 months traveling all over the place. We explored Southern India going back and forth from Chennai to Trichy to Aloompoondi and we even took a vacation to the backwaters of Kerala in which we stayed on a houseboat. Kerala’s backwaters is somewhat similar to the bayou as it is a network of interconnected canals, rivers, lakes and inlets. It is truly a labyrinthine system formed by nearly 600 miles of waterways.

Though I have been a vegetarian collectively almost 1/2 of my life picking it up and dropping it on and off over the years, I found it difficult in India. The one thing I looked forward to was when we would go to Chennai  (one of 2 times total) they had a Pizza Hut and I ordered myself a whole large pizza with real pepperoni…. omg it was delicious.

 

At the end of our trip we had the forethought to plan to fly out of Northern India so we had no excuse not to visit the tourist sights and see the Taj Mahal. So George and I visited a Indian travel agent and set up a trip to see the Golden Triangle which included Seeing the Taj Mahal, visiting New Delhi, Agra, the Pink City of Jaipur, Rajastan  New Delhi, Agra and Rajasthan.

Jaipur is the capital city of Rajasthan and is also known as the Pink City. The maharaja painted the whole city pink, the color of hospitality, when Queen Victoria and the Prince of Wales visited Jaipur in 1876. We visited the city’s historic forts and palaces.

We also visited Amber Fort- a marvelous example of Rajput architecture and a UNESCO World Heritage site. The interior of the fort has various royal halls decorated with intricate ivory, mirror and glass work complemented by exquisite wall paintings. It was here that we took an elephant ride around the fort and realized if you give an ounce of interest to those selling you something you will miss all of the sights and you will only haggle the whole tour…

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Luckily today I have 2 beautiful blankets with round mirrors on them to tell everyone about the scenery I missed because I had to buy these blankets.

 

This Golden Triangle Tour really was everything that people think they will see in India. We ran into so many Western Tourists who said they absolutely LOVED India because they only stayed in Northern India. We had such a different and life altering experience in India the two weeks we spent doing the golden triangle was like a vacation that I only remember sparse memories from. The sights were beautiful and I would totally plan to go back for this Northern India Experience again… Ask me to move to India all expenses paid again? I would have to decline.

So moral of the story, I LOVE what I do in tourism… I think traveling the world opens your mind, heart and soul to people. There are new experiences all around you waiting for you to enjoy. It opens your life to opportunity, and it opens your eyes to the world.

I will be sharing pictures of my experience at our upcoming event “Spotlight on Travel” Wednesday, February 8th and would be more than happy to share the full story with you. Want more information on a specific destination in India? Just let me know. 386-734-7245

 

Explorer Spotlight: Antarctica on Azamara Club Cruises

explorer-spotlightExplorer Spotlight: Antarctica on Azamara Club Cruises

 

dianeheadBy: Diane Congdon- an adventurous and well traveled client of Roseborough Travel Agency.

 

The most absolute-over-the-top trip I have ever taken was a cruise to Antarctica in 2008 on the Azamara Journey.  At about 700 passengers, it was the smallest, most luxurious ship and the longest trip I had taken.

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Why Antarctica?  As a long-time Floridian, I am always looking for cooler weather and mountains for my trips.  The scenery was so breathtakingly spectacular that it is not describable in words.  I spent three days standing on the deck from dawn to dusk in rain, snow, sleet, hail and sunshine looking at icebergs more than a mile long and much taller than the ship (and remember only 1/10 of the berg actually shows above the water), beautiful mists, whales and bazillions of penguins and other birds, only coming in to get dry gloves and socks and a hot drink.  We went where the ice captains knew there were things to see with no set itinerary; if we saw something, the ship stopped and we looked.

The real bonus was the Chilean fjords.  Because the ship was so small, we hugged the coast line of Chile from Valparaiso down to the tip of South America.  The fjords rivaled, and may have exceeded, the beauties of the Alaska and Norway coasts.  The other real bonus was the people; the Chileans, Uruguayans and Argentinians were so welcoming and so proud of their lands.  I took a horseback ride to the end of the Americas; drank great Chilean wines; had Uruguayan barbecue at a ranch; bought a hand-woven wool shawl from the woman who carded the wool, wove the yarn and made the shawl (using sign language, finger waving and smiles to make the purchase).

 

And, yes, Roseborough planned this trip for me.

 

This trip is still at the top of my list to do again.  Along with a safari-laden trip to South Africa.

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